Bearded Collie – Great For The Family

The Bearded Collie is a medium sized dog that weighs between 40-58 pounds. They are 20″ to 22″ in height. Their abundant hair gives the impression that they are larger than they actually are. They have a happy, friendly nature and are not watch dogs in any way as they are friendly with all that they meet.Recognized by the AKC, the acceptable coat colors for the Bearded Collie are black, grey, tan, brown or fawn with some white markings. When they are puppies, they may or …

The Bearded Collie is a medium sized dog that weighs between 40-58 pounds. They are 20″ to 22″ in height. Their abundant hair gives the impression that they are larger than they actually are. They have a happy, friendly nature and are not watch dogs in any way as they are friendly with all that they meet.

Recognized by the AKC, the acceptable coat colors for the Bearded Collie are black, grey, tan, brown or fawn with some white markings. When they are puppies, they may or may not have white markings. As they mature, their coat color either fades or changes. The most common colors are black with white or gray with white. Their long, harsh, straight and shaggy outer coat and short, soft, thick undercoat requires a daily brushing to prevent tangles. Their nickname is “beardie” because of the long, shaggy hair under their chin.

This energetic, loving, happy-go-lucky breed makes an excellent family pet. They are people dogs and love to be with their family. They are wonderful for homes with children and other dogs and can do well with other non-canine pets provided they have early socialization. They are enthusiastic, outgoing, and lively and require plenty of exercise and play time. They need a yard to run and roam. Having toys on hand is a good idea if you are going to be gone for an extended period of time. Early training is recommended because they have a stubborn tendency at times. They are easy to train.

Dating back over 500 years, the Bearded Collie originated in Scotland. They are considered to be descendents of the Polish sheepdog. They were bred to heard sheep and cattle, thus explaining their collie name which means herding dog in Scotland. They have also been used for tracking. They are still used as sheep herding dogs in some areas.

Friendly to family and strangers alike, the Bearded Collie will greet all he meets with enthusiasm. Because they require regular outdoor exercise and play, they are best with active families who will give them the activity that they need. Homes with other dogs and children can feel confident in adding a Bearded Collie to their family.

At Last! Cat Litter Boxes Don’t Have To Be Evil

There is nothing worse for cat or cat owner than a smelly litter box.

There is nothing worse for cat or cat owner than a smelly litter box.

For many people, the litter box is the worst of part of owning a cat. Not only is it something people dread to clean but it is also dusty and dirty. And, those who have to clean it can find themselves more susceptible to cat diseases that are present there. Sure, it뭩 a bad job but it doesn뭪 have to be too hard either.

There are many new litter boxes being designed to make the job, well, easier. One of them is the hooded litter box. These give the privacy to cats who are more sensitive and they also keep dust down considerably. They are idea of a single cat owner as long as they are cleaned regularly. Those who do not want to handle the litter can use removable liners for these boxes. They can lift out the whole liner and throw it out. All you need to do is put in a new liner and add the fresh litter to it.

Self Cleaning Boxes

Another option is the self cleaning box. These are idea for families that have many cats. Or they can be a good choice for anyone who doesn뭪 want to have to deal with it. A rake removes the soiled litter into a removable receptacle which leaves the box clean. All you need to do is to discard the contents of the receptacle right into the trash.

To teach your kitten to use the litter box, all you need to do is to position it in the right place and keep it very clean. The litter box should never be located next to wear the cat sleeps or near where his food is.

Once in the right place, you뭠l need to tell him what the box is used for. To do this, place the cat in the box and rake your fingers through the litter. The cat may decide to start using the box right away. When he does, praise him greatly. If he just wants out, play with him a few minutes and then put him back in. Repeat this several times but don뭪 push it. You don뭪 want to make him frustrated.

When to use the Box?

About ten to fifteen minutes after your cat eats, put him back into the litter box. When he uses it, praise him for doing so. When he is napping, watch him so that you can take him to the litter box as he wakes up.

Remember that cats respond better to praise than to scolding. If he becomes angry or frustrated, you will not accomplish anything. Place the box in the spot where he most frequently has accidents and encourage him to use it.

A cat may stop using his litter box if you don뭪 keep it clean. Most cats will continue to use the litter box once he has done so several times, but you need to keep it clean. Also, a dirty litter box can lead to cat health problems so make sure to keep it clean.

These are some quick and easy tips to keeping your cat’s litter box clean. If you use them your cat will be your best friend.

Are Portuguese Water Dogs Hypoallergenic?

Portuguese Water Dogs have short hair that does not shed and is considered a working dog, meaning that it is a breed that needs to stay busy. This breed is considered a hypoallergenic dog.

Portuguese Water Dogs have short hair that does not shed and is considered a working dog, meaning that it is a breed that needs to stay busy. This breed is considered a hypoallergenic dog. Traditionally used to assist in fishing expeditions, the Portuguese Water Dog is now kept as a house pet. While this breed is not as common as other breeds, if you want to dog that is hypoallergenic, lively, and enjoys companionship, then this breed may be the one for you.

Since the Portuguese Water Dog is not bred as often as other breeds of hypoallergenic dog, you will have to search for a breeder online, in the newspaper, or by calling breeders in your area until you find one. Generally happy dogs, the PWD needs to stay busy or it will get bored. You should have plenty of toys for it to play with and you may want to consider crate training when you are not at home. This means that the dog will stay in a crate when you go out so it does not destroy your home. When the PWD gets bored or lonely, it will chew on anything it finds.

Crate training should begin right after you bring the dog home. By placing a blanket, toys and water into the crate, you will make the dog comfortable while you are away. You should not use the crate when punishing the dog or it will not want to go in it when you leave for the day. After training the dog, you will have to keep up the routine. This will give the dog structure and will also salvage your possessions. Keeping the dog in a crate when you are not at home will also reduce allergens.

Portuguese Water Dogs need to be groomed every two months or so. There are two patterns that most groomers follow, the retriever cut and the lion cut. The retriever cut means that the hair is cut evenly on the body. The lion cut leaves that front half of the dog’s body covered with hair, while hair on the hind legs is cut short. You should take the dog to have his hair groomed if you are not comfortable cutting it yourself.

If you are considering buying a PWD, you should be prepared to have constant companionship. These breeds need to be walked and they need to be entertained throughout the day. If you need to travel on vacation or for work, you should board the dog so it will not be lonely. Portuguese Water Dogs typically live between twelve and fifteen years.

Portuguese Water Dogs are easy going and get along with children and most adults. If you are looking for a breed that does not shed and will fit in with your family, then the PWD is the breed for you. While most Portuguese Water Dogs are black, some are white or a mix of both. Their hair is curly or wavy and similar to that of the standard poodle.

Annoying Habits Your Dog Does

Dear Adam:

My Springer Spaniel has gotten a little more resistant to the come command when she knows it means “Get in the kennel.” At night, she goes in between nine and ten. And like clock work, she wakes me up at 2:00 am. I am sure I have started a bad habit, but I am afraid the neighbors are being disturbed. She still digs once or twice a week during the day. It’s like she goes into a panic after 4 to 5 hours in the kennel.

Thanks,
Dick

Dear Dick:

  1. Go to he…

Dear Adam:

My Springer Spaniel has gotten a little more resistant to the come command when she knows it means “Get in the kennel.” At night, she goes in between nine and ten. And like clock work, she wakes me up at 2:00 am. I am sure I have started a bad habit, but I am afraid the neighbors are being disturbed. She still digs once or twice a week during the day. It’s like she goes into a panic after 4 to 5 hours in the kennel.

Thanks,
Dick

Dear Dick:

  1. Go to her and make her come when you call her, if you do not see that she moves to respond within 1/2 a second of your command. But I personally like to use a specific command such as, “Get in the kennel.” If she doesn’t immediately move towards the kennel, I will go and get her and walk her in the kennel. If you wait to see if she’s going to respond, then she will wait to see if you’re going to make her. (That is, until the behavior has become a conditioned response.)

When you say kennel, you mean a crate– for at night, right? If not, then this is where she should be sleeping at night. Put her in the crate and then give her a cookie. This will reinforce that going into the crate is a positive thing.

  1. For the outside kennel, buy some hardware mesh or chicken wire and put it under the entire kennel run and then put about an inch of dirt on top of that. Dogs don’t like digging and clawing against this type of material.
  2. Increase her exercise regimen. Buy yourself a bike and take her for a 2 mile run each day. It’s good for you, too… and it will work wonders in reducing your dog’s boredom.

That’s all for now, folks!
Adam
Dogproblems.com

Animal lovers are never lonely

The people who disserve the most love and respect and which will never be lonely are the animal lovers. Having an animal pet for a friend means a lot of responsibility, but a lot of love also.

Early childhood is an impressionable period of life in which children are often dog lovers. Parents have a great contribution in the building of their children뭩 character by encouraging them to be animal lovers and allowing them to have a dog as a pet. Parents should encourage their young to become animal lovers because this will mean never to be alone, to always have a friend, to be comforted when sad, to be happy and needed, to learn responsibility and, last but not least, to love. That’s what an animal friend teaches a child: the most valuable lesson of all.

Seeing dog lovers in parks, on television, in stores and on the streets, one can realize the benefit of having a pet as company. Having a dog or cat around the house will surely bring animal lovers a lot of smiles. Cuddling, big round eyes sending messages of love, cute fluffy ears or tail moving in signs of joy should make any heart melt. Animal lovers are the ones that feel for these helpless beings. A pet is not an object one buys to keep around the house, but a living thing that communicates and interacts with the persons around it. Animal lovers know that and they appreciate every smile a pet brings on their faces.

Dog lovers know that pets depend and need them more than a human ever will. The animals around the house have to be fed and watered and cleaned constantly, just like a child. They need their masters just like a child needs his mother to survive. Having a pet means having a lot of responsibility and dog lovers sacrifice their time, money and effort to keep their beloved company around them. Animal lovers assume the responsibility towards their pets with pleasure and never regret their efforts, because they do it out of love. In exchange, animal lovers receive even more. Animal lovers are never lonely, are always loved by their pets, they never get disappointed and often receive the comfort that a human could not give them. Not to mention animal lovers won’t ever feel nagged by their pets, neglected or left aside. Having an animal for a friend is having a true friend for life.

Another reason to why animal lovers are never lonely is the fact that their sacrifices talk a lot about the kind of persons they are: communicative, generous, not selfish, always around to help their friends in need, loving and attentive. There are many people who would want these qualities in their friends or their lovers, so animal lovers are very appreciated and loved by everyone. Single persons that are dog lovers can easily find company not only in their animal friends, but in their human friends also. Not to mention that dog lovers usually find dog lovers also as their friends, because their passion for the same pets will give them a lot of things in common to talk about. A shared passion (of any kind) will always bring two persons together. Imagine a dog lover going out to walk the dog every day. Who is he most likely going to have as a friend? Will it be his female neighbor that can’t stand dog lovers? Or will it be the girl that walks her own dog in the park every morning just like him? Animal lovers, because they love life and its smallest proofs (animals) will never be alone and they will always share their pleasure with those that appreciate the same thing as them.

So if you are looking for company, animal and human, don’t forget animal lovers and their pets! They will bring you the soul medicine everyone needs: love.

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Bite

One of the most common misconceptions people have is that their own dogs won’t bite. While everybody feels some level of respect for a big, growling dog we are becoming too nonchalant about our own dogs. How confident are you that your dog will never bite anyone?

One of the most common misconceptions people have is that their own dogs won’t bite. While everybody feels some level of respect for a big, growling dog we are becoming too nonchalant about our own dogs. How confident are you that your dog will never bite anyone?

Do the words – Wouldn’t hurt a fly come to mind? We all think that our own dogs are gentle natured until they prove us otherwise.
Dog owners often claim their dogs are completely comfortable with children. I myself was bitten as a child it happens often and even usually mild mannered dogs can snap. Children are a little more vulnerable and a little snap that wouldn’t injure an adult can have dire consequences for a well-meaning child.

Dogs can inflict potentially life threatening injuries. Luckily my injuries were only superficial. Some corrective surgery and a few years of healing and the physical evidence have all but gone. Many are not as fortunate.

Tragically for the most part, these kinds of bites are completely avoidable. Dogs don’t bite people without provocation right?
Not quite. It’s true it does take some provoking to get a usually mild mannered dog to bite the triggers aren’t as obvious as you would think.

So why do dogs bite?
Experts still disagree as to whether dogs bite because of human provocation or breeding. While it is indisputable that certain breeds of dogs do bite more than others it’s also hard to argue with thousands of year뭩 worth of domestication. People have been trying to breed the aggressive out of the dog for the most part anyway.

There are some human behaviors that can provoke even docile dogs:

-Fiddling with their food: don’t disturb your dog (or any dog) while they are eating.
-Sudden movements can upset dogs, if a strange dog is growling at you its best to back away slowly.
-The old saying let sleeping dogs lie is true. Don’t startle a dog that is sleeping.
-Dogs have a powerful sense of territory, and may become upset when someone unfamiliar threatens their space.
-Don’t try to disrupt a dog fight.
-Dogs have strong maternal instincts and if there are puppies you should be careful not to startle the mother (or any adult dog the area).
-Dogs can be confused about the cause of their own illness or pain; they might think it was the owner who caused the pain and bite.
-Dogs become afraid just like humans any dog can bite if it feels it is in danger.
-All dogs experience some form of possessiveness. Tread carefully if a dog is growling at you chances are you뭨e on his turf.
-Looking a dog in the eyes is seen as a challenging of dominance. If a dog is growling at you lower your eyes and back away slowly.

Preventing dog bites starts with the owner. If you have a dog you can reduce the risk that your dog might attack someone with some of these suggestions
.
-Have your dog spayed or neutered. Not only does it prevent many kinds of health problems later in life, it drastically reduces the aggression levels in male and female dogs.
-Start socializing your puppy at a young age. Get your puppy used to being in a busy and unfamiliar environment as soon as he is vaccinated.
-Invest in some kind of formal training program. This will give you an immense faith in your dog and strengthen the relationship between you two.
-Take your dog to the vet regularly and make sure all his vaccinations are always up to date. Get your dog licensed and keep up to date on all his paperwork.
-Never let your dog wander freely. Your dog should be contained on your property and you should be able to control his access to the street.

By following these very few and common sense steps you can reduce an attack or bites by a wide margin. Be a responsible owner and start working with your puppy or dog today.

All About The Boston Terrier

The Boston Terrier has been nicknamed, and justly so “the American Gentleman.” And has earned its nick name due to its wonderful, gentle disposition. Not to mention its tuxedo like coat. The Boston Terrier is one of the few breeds that is truly “made in the America,” ” American Kennel club rates the Boston Terrier as one of the most intelligent breeds”…

It is hard to believe that the gentle Boston Terrier that we see today was once bread for as a pit-fighting dog. It is …

The Boston Terrier has been nicknamed, and justly so “the American Gentleman.” And has earned its nick name due to its wonderful, gentle disposition. Not to mention its tuxedo like coat. The Boston Terrier is one of the few breeds that is truly “made in the America,” ” American Kennel club rates the Boston Terrier as one of the most intelligent breeds”…

It is hard to believe that the gentle Boston Terrier that we see today was once bread for as a pit-fighting dog. It is very difficult to comprehend that these friendly little dogs were once fierce pit fighters. Boston Terriers resembles the Staffordshire Bull Terrier, which possesses a strong fighting instinct. Today’s Boston Terriers in no way resemble the fighter it once was known to be.

This little gentleman of a dog that you will find today has evolved a long way from the pits of Boston. It is sad to think these wonderful dogs once were used to making money for their owners. Not only fighting in the pits, but as stud dogs, to produce more fighter. They were well prized, and highly valued for stud service.

In fact todays Boston Terrier is well known for its friendly disposition, intelligence, and lively personality. The breed has a wonderful disposition, and possesses good amount of intelligence, which makes the Boston Terrier a very desirable all around family pet. When choosing a Boston Terrier one should be educated on the breed. Along with some knowledge of just what to expect of the breed, and what qualities to look for when choosing your Boston Terrier. Your number one consideration should be to locate a good Boston Terrier breeder.

I have attempted to provided my readers with some useful history, and breed information. With hopes of aquatinting a perspective Boston Terrier owner with this wonderful breed of dog, the Boston Terrier.

The Boston Terriers origin was England. They bred Bull Terriers and Bulldogs, to produce a very powerful compact muscular bred. In the late 1800s some members of this hybrid stock were sent to America. In 1889, some dog fanciers in Boston organized the first American Bull Terrier Club.

Terrier breeders club members had great objections to this new breed, along with Bulldog fanciers objected that these crosses were not Terriers. In 1891 the name American Bull Terrier was changed to Boston Terrier Club of America. And standards for the Boston Terrier breed were written. They sought entrance to the AKC stud book, but were denied. By 1893, however, the breed was accepted and the first Boston Terrier was admitted To the AKC. The first Boston Terrier to be accepted as the standard of the breed was a dog by the title of Hector #28814, by Bixby’s Tony ex Dimple.

It took some time before the breed to catch on. It was not until 1915 that the breed had become the most popular breed in the country. The Boston Terrier was number one in registrations of the top twenty breeds. They again lead in registrations in 1920, and in 1930. The Boston’s terriers remained in the top ten position until 1960. Since then they have slipped in popularity.

Boston Terriers are extremely easy dogs to live with wanting only to please. Boston’s are extremely easy to train. Boston’s are strictly house dogs, they are not able to cope with extreme cold, nor can they deal with extreme heat. Boston’s can overheat very quickly due to the short muzzle and a slightly elongated palate.

Boston’s Terriers are high energy dogs, and need daily exercise. They are playful, and love all sorts of toys. Fetching, and, and playing with children is a favorite with this dog. It is always wise to teach a child how to play with a dog, and not to be overly aggressive with this breed. The Boston Terrier is a very intelligent dog, and prefers fetching, and finding a hidden toy, than wrestling…

Care of the Boston Terrier is easy, they being a short haired dog that sheds minimally. Weekly brushing is recommended, a rubber palm brush is what is recommended for their particular coat. The brushes I have found that work the best are: rubber palm brush and grooming mit. Work the palm brush in a circular motion, this aids in removing lose hair.

Due to the breeds elongated palate they may snore. It is normal in the Boston Terriers may show some degree of airway obstruction. Another problem in this breed, gas. A good diet, along with regular exercise, will keep this problem at bay.

Proper diet should always be considered a must with the Boston Terrier. To start as a puppy to adulthood, to old age. An improper diet as a rule will lead to gas, and intestinal problems for the Boston Terrier. While a puppy the diet must be healthy in order for the dog to form a good bone structure, and good muscle mass. Not to mention this is the time a dog will build a good immune system, to later ward off disease, and infections.

Health problems that the Boston Terrier has a predominance toward, juvenile cataracts, and hypothyroidism. As a rule juvenile cataracts can occur between 8 weeks and 12 months. If hypothyroid disease occurs, it can be controlled by medication.

The Boston Terrier is smooth coated, and short-headed, in general body is compact, with a short tail. The tail being short, All and all a very well proportioned, balanced dog. The head is in proportion to the size of the dog. The body is rather short and, due to this shortness of tail being so prominent, the dog may appears badly proportioned. The limbs strong and neatly turned.

The coat is short, smooth and bright with a fine texture. Color and markings, Desirable colors included, seal, black or brindle, with evenly marked white area’s. Brindle is the preferred. Seal appears black, with the except of a red cast that can be present when the dog is viewed in sun light. True black will appear black in any type of lighting.

Desirable markings to look for in a Boston Terrier include, white muzzle band, even white blaze between the eyes and over the head, white collar, white forechest, white on part or whole of forelegs and hind legs below the hocks.

Weight is divided by classes as follows: Under 15 pounds; 15 pounds and under 20 pounds; 20 pounds and not to exceed 25 pounds. A Boston Terriers leg length should balance with the length of body to give its unique square appearance. The Boston Terrier is a sturdy dog and must not appear to be either spindly or coarse. The muscle and bone must be in proportion, as well as the dog’s weight and structure. If weight and structure are out of balance the dog will appear blocky or chunky in appearance. The thighs are strong with good muscle mass, bent at the stifles and set true. The hocks are short to the feet, turning neither in nor out, with a well defined hock joint. The feet are small very compact with short nails.

The Head, the skull of a Boston Terries is square, flat on top, and smooth void of any wrinkles. Its cheeks flat, brow abrupt and well defined. The eyes are wide apart, set square in the skull, outside corners are in line with the cheeks. The Boston Terriers eyes are round, with large shocketts, dark in color, with a trace of dark blue. The ears are small, and erect. It is desirable that the ears are situated as near to the corners of the skull as possible. May need to be cropped to obtain the proper stature.

A Boston Terriers muzzle should be short, square, wide and deep, wrinkle free, and well proportioned to the dogs head. The muzzle is shorter in length than in width or depth. Not exceeding in length one-third of the length of the skull. The muzzle from stop to end of the nose is parallel to the top of the skull. The nose is black and wide, with a well defined line between the nostrils. The jaw is broad and square, teeth are short and regular in appearance. The bite is even or sufficiently undershot to square the muzzle. The chops are of good depth, but not completely covering the teeth when the mouth is closed. The Boston Terriers _expression as a rule, portrays pure intelligence’s along with great determination.

Neck, The length of neck must display balance to the total dog. It is a bit arched, carrying the head with grace, and sitting neatly into the shoulders. The back is just short, this give rise to the Boston Terrier Square appearance. The top-line is level, the rump curves slightly to the set-of the tail. The chest is wide and deep. The body should appear short. The tail is set on low, short. The preferred tail does not exceed in length more than one-quarter the distance from set-on to hock.

The Boston Terrier is a friendly and lively dog. The breed has an excellent disposition and a high degree of intelligence, which makes the Boston Terrier an incomparable companion. Not to mention they are very easy to train. They catch on quickly, and remember what they learn.

When buying a Boston Terrier take in to consideration. Will the dog be integrated with children? If your children are young, it is recommand an older puppy or grown dog. A dog that can hold its own, when having to flee an over active child. Will the pet be coming into a home with an elderly person?An older dog is recommended. A dog that will require less activity, and will be less likely to get under foot. Make sure to take in account how much time you have to spend with your new dog? A puppy deserves an owner that will have time to train, and play with them. An older mature dog requires much less play time, and as a rule should be trained by the breeder. Are you willing to take the time to house train? Are your positive you are ready to handle the responsibility for a pet?

You have made up your mind, and are ready to make a long time commitment to caring for a pet. Where do you start to find just the right dog?

Start by asking your local Veterinarian for referrals on breeders. You can also contacting breeding clubs, most have referral lists of breeders. When you find a breeder, make an appointment to visit, and look over the kennels, and dogs on the premises. Is all in good order? Do the dogs look healthy? Do the dogs have a good rapport with the breeder? Does the breeder appear interested in placing the dog in the right home or are they just ready to sell to the first buyer? Ask the breeder if they sell to pet stores. Remember, a reputable breeder will never sell her dogs to a pet store. A good breeder is very discriminative on who their dogs will be sold to. A good breeder will interview a perspective buyer, with hopes of placing their dogs with just the right owner.

Once you feel comfortable that you have located just the right breeder. I suggest you do some research on bringing home a puppy. It is smart to be well educated in training techniques, what you will need in regard to supplies. Also the best suggestions to make your new little family member feel at home. Its a good idea to read up on the actual breed you have decided to buy. Breeds differ in many ways. Its good to know up front any and all tendency a given breed may exhibit.

You have made up your mind to purchase a Boston Terrier. You have found a good breeder, and are ready to head out and pick that pup… Here are the general traits you should look for when choosing a Boston Terrier. Keep in mind, you may just fall in love with a bum of the breed, that’s good too… They all need good homes, and will bring lots of love into your home. You see, the prize or the runt of the litter, don’t realize they are different from one another. They both have a great capacity to give friendship, and love to their family.

Alaskan Malamute – The Nordic Sled Dog

The Alaskan Malamute is a hard working sled dog and a loving companion. Learn more about their history and lifestyle here.

The Alaskan Malamute is a medium-large to large dog that weighs between 70-95 pounds and measures up to 25″. They are best known as sled dogs and are used to hard work. They ideal for cold climates or homes that will keep them cool and hydrated in hot summers. The Alaskan Malamute has a thick, coarse outer coat and wooly, dense undercoat. They are dressed for cold weather. If you own an Alaskan Malamute and live in a warmer climate, you need to make sure that they have a place to get out of the sun and plenty of water.

They come in a variety of colors including solid white, shadings of light to medium gray, black, sable, and red. In animals with shadings, parts of legs, feet, the underbody, and part of face markings are predominantly white. The AKC does not recognize any other solid colors than white.

Alaskan Malamutes are independent, friendly and loyal. They are more active as puppies and tend to mellow when they get older. They are chewers, diggers and explorers. If you don’t want it played with, than put it away. When your Alaskan Malamute is outside, make sure that they can’t dig out of the yard or jump over they fence. They are not good apartment, small home or city dogs. They love to be outside and need plenty of room to play. Because they are extremely playful as puppies, they would be better for older children until they become calmer. They work best with other animals and pets when they are socialized at a young age. They can be aggressive towards other dogs and can consider small animals prey. This is an ideal dog for a family home that allows plenty of outdoor time to play and explore

The breed dates back over 2000 years and is a native of Alaska. They were originally used as sled dogs by the Alaskan Malamute Eskimo tribe. In addition to a companion dog, the Alaskan Malamutes are still used as sled dogs for racing, exploration and families living in arctic regions.

As hardworking sled dogs, they are important household pets for families living in cold, snow covered areas and imperative to their way of life. If you are looking for an independent but loving companion, the Alaskan Malamute is a perfect dog for you.

Airedale Terrier – The King of the Terriers

The Airedale Terrier is an active and loving dog. Check out it’s background here.

The Airedale Terrier is a medium 45 to 65 pound dog that usually reaches between 22″ and 24″. Known as the King of the Terriers, they are largest of the Terrier breeds recognized by the AKC. It is a compact little powerhouse that is all terrier when it comes to chasing little animals or appeasing its curiosity.

Airedale Terriers are typically tan on the ears, head, chest, undersides, legs, and sometimes on the shoulders. They are black or grizzle on the sides and upper parts of the body. Sometimes they have a red mixture on the black or white markings on the chest. Certain strains of the breed also have a small white patch on the chest. Their wiry, dense outer coat requires regular grooming.

If you are looking for a dog with plenty of stamina and energy, look no further. The Airedale Terrier is full of energy and needs daily exercise and play. Generally speaking, they do best with older well behaved children and are not ideal for homes with smaller pets as terriers have the tendency to chase small animals and vermin. They can do well with other dogs, especially if they are socialized from puppyhood. They are loyal and protective if their family. They love to learn and can be trained easily provided training is fun and not monotonous.

The breed dates itself back to 18th century England. The breed is a cross between an Otterhound and a Waterside Terrier. They were bred for hunting small game and were later used in big game hunting, police work and as an army dog in WWII. The Airedale Terrier is now considered more of a family pet than working dog. However, they do love to work and have tasks to do and still make good hunting and tracking dogs

For a family that enjoys outdoors and exercise, the Airedale Terrier is an excellent choice. Although they can work with other pets and dogs, a one pet household seems more ideal for their needs unless they grow up with other family pets. The Airedale Terrier is a great pet for the family on the go.

Aggression When Another Dog Invades Her Space

Dear Adam,

Hi, I have a 3 year-old Australian Cattle Dog. She is a wonderfully obedient dog, canine good citizen certified and everything. She is very obedient and good natured to people, however she is very dominant when it comes to other dogs. Recently I have been having problems with her snapping at other dogs if they come up to her while she is on a leash. This is not a problem if I tell her to sit and the other dog stays a normal distance away. She doesn’t like dogs i…

Dear Adam,

Hi, I have a 3 year-old Australian Cattle Dog. She is a wonderfully obedient dog, canine good citizen certified and everything. She is very obedient and good natured to people, however she is very dominant when it comes to other dogs. Recently I have been having problems with her snapping at other dogs if they come up to her while she is on a leash. This is not a problem if I tell her to sit and the other dog stays a normal distance away. She doesn’t like dogs invading her space and standing over her (she is only 35 pounds, so most dogs tower over her). I call it her “Napoleon Complex”. I tried to work on the problem by putting a muzzle on her and setting up situations so I can correct her, but she realizes that she is in no position to show the other dog who is boss while muzzled and refrains. We have recently started therapy dog training classes, which she is doing very well in.

Like I said she is a perfect angel around people. In a therapy situation she is unlikely to encourage other dogs on or off leash who will be allowed to be in a position close enough to upset her, however, if some instance did occur, I would feel uncomfortable with her snapping at another dog. In most instances, I can prevent a situation where she would be tempted to snap from occurring, however, there are some instances that can’t be avoided. Do you have any suggestions? I’m debating whether I should discontinue her therapy dog classes.

Thank You,
Katie

Dear Katie,

This is really more of a handler sigue. It’s your responsibility to NOT LET other dogs invade her space. Now, you can correct her for the aggression – but at the same time, you must show her that she can trust you, and that you will not let strange dogs from another pack wonder up and get in her face. This is the job of the pack leader – to protect the pack. And you’re not doing your job by letting strangers off the street walk up and get too close. I would recommend a walking stick or a stun gun.

As for the therapy dog training – I would recommend that you continue, but without seeing the dog in person, this will ultimately be a judgement call which you must make for yourself and your dog.

That’s all for now, folks!
Adam